Vol. 196 July 15, 2018 Consequences of Separating Children From Their Parents

July 15, 2018

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“Home Security and Family Values –
Is that an oxymoron?”

 

 

Hundreds of children in immigrant families wishing to enter the U.S. from Mexico have been separated from their parents by U.S. policy. The administration has not released the actual number, but the number of unaccompanied children held in U.S. detention centers jumped up by 20% from 8,000 to a little over 10,000 children after implementation of the “zero tolerance policy”.

In 2016 the Secretary of Home Security John Kelly began to talk about such a separation policy as a deterrent to families seeking entrance either illegally or even if legally seeking asylum on our Mexican border. In response to that proposed policy a coalition of pediatricians, psychiatrists, and social scientists published “Separating Families at the Border – Consequences for Children’s Health and Well-Being” in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) June 15, 2017 and founded the Child Advisory Network   to advocate against the “zero tolerance policy”.

Now, nobody really believes that separating children from their parents, unless the children are being maltreated or abused, is good for the children. Our own legal system has a very high threshold for removing children from their parents. And maybe, administration policy makers were probably counting on this universal belief (in all languages, of course) to make their action an effective deterrent to immigration.

The NEJM article summarized the many studies that document the deleterious effects of separating children from parents; all based on the over-activation of the stress response system of the child’s brain and specific hormone producing organs. Proper balance of that system is necessary for normal physical growth, proper and appropriate regulation of emotions, and maintenance of good health. In fact, such stress and anxiety is apparently cumulative and can ever result in an earlier-than-expected death!

The high costs of separating and detaining the children, especially the costs of finding and supporting foster care for U.S.-citizen children of parents who have already been deported, was cited in this review. In many states the foster care system for American children is overwhelmed and an occasional source of horror stories of maltreatment by foster parents.

Perhaps you’re thinking that these are moot points after the announcement of the reversal of the “zero tolerance policy”, but NPR reported on July 12 that in a response to a court order deadline only 57 of the 100 under the age of 5 years had been reunited with their parents (49 other were not). NPR also reported that the total number of separated children is 3000. The next court order deadline in about two weeks calls for 2000 families to be reunited. Both court orders stem from suits brought by the ACLU against the U.S. Department of Home Security.

Reason cited by the Home Security Department for some “failures to reunite” include criminal charges against a parent(s), parent not available since already deported, and a lack of match between the child’s DNA and the parents’ DNA. Wow, talk about opening up another Pandora’s box for the U.S. border staff, Home Security Department, and our judicial system, already creaking under “zero tolerance policy” consequences. Resolution of those instances of DNA “mismatch” will become another nightmare for already stressed-out families and children who were seeking sanctuary from the stress of living in their own country in the first place; a uniquely modern negative consequence of political policy once again trumping science.

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Vol. 195 July 1, 2018 BIG DATA and a whiff of AI in health care

July 1, 2018

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“When it comes to health data, Watson hasn’t been much help.”
-STATNEWS, Ross and Swetlitz. Bos Globe 6/18/18

This week all the newspapers (at least in Massachusetts) have been abuzz with the announcement that Atul Gawande, MD has been picked by three moneyed titans of innovation to head their new company to revolutionize health care. Optimism, promise, and hope is in the air! Kind of like when IBM presented Watson, its supercomputer, in 2015 as the tool to provide workable insights into the financial and clinical dilemmas of U.S. hospitals in 2015 via Watson Health.

How is that working out? Watson Health has access to data on tens of millions patients, in part by spending $9 billion to acquire other companies. It’s initial focus was on developing workable products in oncology, designed to help physicians individualize cancer treatments. “With these acquisitions, IBM will be one of the world’s leading health data, analytics, and insights companies, and the only one that can deliver the unique cognitive capabilities of the Watson platform”, said the general manager of Watson Health in 2015.

They (the newly merged companies) struggled with the basic step of learning about the different forms of cancer and the rapidly changing landscape of treatments. Last week Watson Health laid off people partly because, according to some, even Watson had difficulty in digesting all that data. “…They also don’t understand the generation of information, and how it is used, and whether they can do something different with it,” said Robert Burns, professor of health management at U Penn Wharton School. You can almost hear every primary care physician that is struggling to get their new EMR system to give him/her more information and less data cheering loudly in the background, “We couldn’t have said it better!”

The goal of a great deal of innovative technology in health care is “ “zero patient harm”. if Atul can’t do it all with his surgical checklists and Watson can’t do it all with data from tens of millions of patients , what/who can? How about Artificial Intelligence (AI), aka “machine learning”? AI and machine learning is the converting of data into information without the need for human programmers. For instance, if the computer views enough pictures of different dogs, it will learn to correctly identify a cocker spaniel. I think a real test of AI would be to see if it can recognize a Labradoodle,  or any other of the many poodle cross breeds. (Don’t you sometimes worry about the moral standards of poodles that seem to be eager to mate with any kind of passing breed?)

The building of knowledge from patterns in data, both visual and language, is labeled “computer vision”. In some medical studies “computer vision” is used to monitor actual bedside events and identify omissions or non-compliance in procedures. It has apparently improved rapidly beyond just identifying dogs or skin rashes because of “deep learning”: a type of machine learning that uses “multilayered neural networks whose hierarchical computational design is partly inspired by biologic neutron’s structure.” (1)  Got that? Think Google’s self-driving cars. “Computer vision may soon bring us closer to resolving a seemingly intractable mismatch between the growing complexity of intended clinician behavior and human vulnerability to error.” (2)

So, the effort to cut the Gordian knot of patient safety and cost-effective medicine continues. I suspect that the three titans of innovation have turned to Atul Gawande, a health care innovator who successfully uses clinical insight and re-education to effect change, because they recognize the limitations that are becoming more apparent in big data.

  1.  NEJM April 5, 2018 378:14; 1271-2
  2. Ibid.

Vol. 194 June 1, 2018 Some DOs and DON’Ts

June 1, 2018

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Avoid fried meats which anger up the blood.
-Satchel Paige’s Guide to Good Living

 


DON’T drink alcohol
 Really?? I thought red wine prolonged your life by preventing certain types of heart disease. That IS the current wisdom. It is thought to be the compound reservatrol that provides that benefit. If you believe that then eat lots of grape skins, peanuts, and blueberries for their reservatrol.

A Lancet Journal study of 600,000 current  high-income European drinkers suggests that the threshold for an increased risk of cardiovascular disease is LESS than previously thought. The U.S. Dietary Guidelines, based on previous studies, state that one glass of wine daily for women and two glasses daily men is carries no risk and might even be beneficial. This Lancet study suggests that the threshold of increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease is just one glass a day, regardless of gender. Reviewers of the study remark that such guidelines are not very helpful for individuals. Remembering that obesity kills more people than alcohol is helpful for the context. But, alcohol deaths are still more common than opioid deaths. About one-third of driving fatalities involve alcohol-impaired drivers. In one study 40% of convicted killers said they were under the influence of alcohol when they committed homicide. About 25% of suicides are alcohol related. So, again, as they say on Fox radio news, “We report. You decide.”

DO measure your PAS (Prostate-Specific-Antigen) if your 55-69 years old.
DON’T measure it if you’re 70 or older.
This is a more neutral update of the 2012 U.S. Preventative Services Task Force recommendation against PAS testing because of studies showing overly aggressive diagnostic testing and treatment of low risk patients based on the PAS level. Nowadays “active surveillance” rather than “aggressive treatment” has become the norm as has “shared decision-making” ( the fancy label for discussing the results and management options with your primary physician).

DON’T smoke marijuana if breast-feeding.
A very small study (8 women from Denver, … from where else but?) had their breast milk analyzed for THC at different times after smoking a standard joint. Calculations showed that about 2.5% of the inhaled dose was ingested by the infants. The THC levels in the breast milk were highest in the 1 and 2-hour post-joint breast milk samples . The 20 minute and 4 hour post-joint samples were one-half that. Those breast milk levels are very low, would not cause any apparent change in the infant’s behavior, but the effect of any exposure of cannabis to the developing brain is unknown. No THC metabolites were found in the breast milk.

DO consider liquid nicotine for e-cigarettes as dangerous for toddlers.
One quarter of the nearly 9000 children under 6 years old that got into liquid nicotine meant for e-cigarettes during 2012-2017 had significant clinical effects from the ingestion. Many states, but not all, have legislated child-proof packaging of the liquid nicotine as a result.

DO use the right words for childhood obesity.
Apparently Latino children are more apt to be obese than non-Latino children. A study has shown that those children and parents prefer the words,”unhealthy weight” and “too much weight for the child’s health”. DON’T use “chubby”, “fat”, gordo”, or “muy gordo”. The words “high BMI” and “overweight” were judged to be not motivating in BOTH languages. I guess words DO matter.

DO ignore baby formula marketing pitches.
If you don’t breast feed your infant, then DO use any cow’s milk formula. All the cow’s milk formula’s with added iron are the same nutritionally. DON’T be led astray by marketing ploys like “added amino acids”, “probiotics added”, ” more digestible protein”, etc. The global baby milk formula market is close to $62.5 billion. The only beneficial added ingredient to formula is iron.  Most babies do very well on whatever cow’s milk formula you give them.  Some special infants may need special formulas, but it is a small number. Vegetarians and babies with galactosemia can use soy-milk formula. Otherwise, all infants are “of course, above average” and can thrive on what ever cow’s milk with iron formula you buy for them.

DO reconsider your child’s allergy to penicillin.
Formal allergy testing of 100 children making an ER visit and labeled as “allergic to penicillin” revealed that 0% (nada) of those children with previous low-risk symptoms of penicillin allergy were actually allergic to penicillin. In a follow-up of those children one year later, 60% of them had been given penicillin treatment without incident or allergic reaction symptoms. The estimated savings from using penicillin instead of the higher priced non-penicillin antibiotics for all of the 6700 patients who visit that ER annually with a diagnosis of penicillin allergy was $192,000.

DON’T spend your money for SPF over 30 in sunscreens.
An SPF of 15 blocks 94% of UVB rays. SPF 30 blocks 96%. SPF 40 blocks 97%. None of the usual sunscreens available in the U.S. block the UVA rays which penetrate deeper in the skin and cause aging of the skin. The FDA continues its years-long study of UVA blocking sunscreens already available in Europe. DO put on the sunscreen 30 minutes before going out in the sun to allow its ingredients to activate the skin, and re-apply 20 minutes after exposure to the sun.

and finally . . .

 Avoid running at all times.
DON’T look back. Something might be gaining on you.
– Satchel Paige’s Guide To Good Living


Vol. 193 May 15, 2018 Antibiotics are Beneficial: A Reminder

May 15, 2018

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A disease outbreak anywhere is a risk everywhere.”
-Dr. Tom Frieden, Director U.S. CDC

 

We read a lot about the dangers of using too many antibiotics. The popularity of “organic foods” is due in part to their claim to be from “antibiotic-free” animals and plants. Concern about the increasing antibiotic resistance of germs due to antibiotic overuse is real as is frequently described in scientific journals as well as the general press. Why, then, would the New England Journal of Medicine publish an article describing the benefits of random, mass distribution of an oral antibiotic to nearly 100,000 children who had no symptoms or diagnosis! Maybe because that effort reduced the death rate of children aged 1-5 months by 25%!

As you’ll remember in my last blog,  I was impressed by Bill Gate’s knowledge of the medical literature because during his presentation he cited this antibiotic clinical trial which had been published that very same week. Well, full disclosure, he knew about the study because his foundation funded it! This study is the kind of innovative medical study related to global health that the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation supports. I think it is worthwhile to review the details of the study, if just to remind us that antibiotics are good, that medical science advances on the shoulders of previous work, and that sometimes simple answers, like putting iodine into salt or fluoride into water, can prevent a whole lot of disease.

Previous studies in sub-Saharan Africa showed that blindness caused by trachoma, an infectious disease, could be reduced markedly through the mass distribution of an oral antibiotic, azithromycin. Other studies suggested that the same antibiotic could prevent other infectious deaths like malaria, infectious diarrhea, and pneumonia. It is known that azithromycin affects the transmission of infectious disease, so that treatment of one person might have benefits on others in the same community. The data in two of these studies of trachoma prevention in Ethiopia suggested that mass distribution of azithromycin “might” reduce childhood deaths. Since death (after the neonatal period) is a relatively rare event, even in these settings, the trial had to be conducted in a large population. Hence the need for a large grant to carry it out.

A single dose of oral azithromycin was given to 97,047 children aged from 1 month to 5 years in three African countries during a twice-yearly census. 93,191 children in different communities of the same countries were given a placebo. Over the two-year study the “treated” children received 4 oral doses of azithromycin, each about 6 months apart. Children were identified by the name of the head of the household and GPS coordinates of their location for subsequent censuses. Approval for the study was obtained from 9 ethics committees in 6 countries (3 in the US, 1 in the UK, and 2 in Africa).

The average reduction of annual death rates of children receiving a single dose of the antibiotic every 6 months was 13.5% . Children aged 1 month to 5 months receiving the antibiotic had a mortality rate reduction of 25%. At the conclusion of the trial all the children in the communities of Niger, which has one of the highest child mortality rates in the world and a mortality rate reduction of 18% for all ages in this study, were offered treatment with azithromycin.

This study is a beautiful example of the testing of a simple hypothesis, generated by the results of previous work, using innovative methods, requiring a large population for validity,  and implemented by a multi-national team of medical scientists with a large grant from a private foundation that resulted in clear benefits for better global health.

I, for one, am happy to trumpet some good news about antibiotics and this example of “medical research for all” at its best.

Reference:
Azithromycin to Reduce Childhood Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa, NEJM 378;17, April 26, 2018

 

 

 

 


Vol. 192 May 1, 2018 Infections Going Viral

May 1, 2018

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“World conditions are ripe for a pandemic like the 1918 influenza epidemic, but we, the U.S. and the world, are not prepared to fight it.” – Bill Gates, April 27, 2018

Ten experts (three of them had British accents, so they were particularly believable) agreed with Bill Gates when he presented this warning in the 2018 Shattuck Lecture at the Massachusetts Medical Society Annual Meeting in Boston last week.

The 1918 influenza virus first appeared in the U.S. in New York City and within just 5 weeks it had spread across the country to California resulting in 670,000 U.S. deaths. As you know, the flu virus changes every year and we can’t start making a vaccine until we recognize and identify “this year’s mutation”. It then takes months to produce, distribute, and administer a vaccine, so consequently our flu vaccine is always playing catch up. Since 1918 we have developed anti-viral medicines and a number of different antibiotics to combat influenza complications, so a repeat of such a lethal flu epidemic is today considered unlikely.

But it is the other viruses, the “novel viruses”, that concern the experts at this conference. For instance, 1000 “novel” viruses from different species which could potentially cross over to humans and cause significant disease have been identified over the past 8 years . Of these 1000 “novel” viruses, 891 are brand new, never before identified. Advances in genomic sequencing allow the specific identification of potentially pathogenic mutations, but as one speaker noted it has taken the U.S. Weather Service over 50 years to build a data base that allows “reasonably good” weather forecasts, so our ability to forecast the effects of new virus diseases is considered to be woefully rudimentary. (1)

We will probably receive the earliest warning signs of any new epidemic from mining the “digital exhaust” of our social networks, “flu near you” apps, crowd sourcing of symptom reporting, net-connected thermometers. upticks in certain prescriptions, volunteered Alexa conversations, Google search statistics, bot-driven AI, and locations of Uber-delivered medicines. (2)

The reasons the world is ripe for an infectious pandemic are: increasing population, increasing urbanization in developing countries, continued poverty that promotes inter-species living, routine rapid travel between countries, increasing frequency of natural disasters due to climate change, plus potential bioterrorism. Several speakers used a military preparedness metaphor, consciously using the verb “fight” and the noun “war”. For example, “If we knew our enemy was developing a new military weapon we would be throwing all sorts of resources at analyzing what the threat is, how to detect it at the earliest possible moment, how to defend against it, and how to deal with its effects if deployed. We should be doing the same for future infectious disease epidemics, and we are not.” (3)

Bill Gates was most impressive with his command of diverse, seemingly obscure facts like the per cent change of Uganda’s GDP, the identifying numbers of a new unnamed TB antibiotic, the three viruses that could mimic Ebola, and that in a recent study 4 almost random doses per year of the antibiotic zithromax reduced childhood mortality in developing countries by 50% in 2 years! He remains a man of vision as well , made it clear that the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation would continue its support of innovative health and education efforts, and describes himself as an optimist. He nonchalantly reported that his foundation had just granted $12 million seed money to a group working with Glaxo (stock-pickers take notice) to develop a universal flu vaccine, one that would be effective against all flu virus mutations. (Such a universal flu vaccine was the #1 fervent wish of the Deputy Director of the CDC when asked for her hopes for the next ten years.(4))

 Our pandemic preparedness is not just a task for the medical/clinical sciences nor just for “new” technology.  The “old” technologies of anthropology and the fine art of negotiation were vital to a successful defense against Ebola. It was not until we recognized the cultural traditions of burial rituals of some African tribes, and persuaded them to change them, that we were able to contain the Ebola epidemic. (5)

Pandemic preparedness is not only a multi-disciplinary effort. It must also be political. Even as science advances, there must be the political will to deploy the resources before a pandemic attack . Of course, “urgent” often trumps even important “long term” needs in politics, but a pandemic is the equivalent of a war. By the time the battle is raging it can be too late to effectively marshal all the troops and equipment necessary to win. (3)

The consensus of the conference was: “The U.S. should continue to be the leader in global health security.”

References:
1. Joanna Mazet, DVM, MPVM, PhD, Professor of Medicine, University of California, Davis
2. John Brownstein, PhD, Chief Innovation Officer, Professor of Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital
3. Jeremy Farrar, OBE, FRCP, FRS, Director, Wellcome Trust
4. Anne Schuchat, MD, Principal Deputy director, CDC
5. Mark Gordon, Esq. Co-Founder Vantage Partners


Vol. 191 April 15, 2018 The Gun Violence Epidemic

April 15, 2018

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“EPIDEMIC” continues to be a common catch word for headlines. Apparently we have lots of epidemics; the flu, HIV, opioid, Zika, gun violence, etc. We spend a lot of tax money investigating and containing epidemics. . . . Oh, . . . all except for that last one: gun violence.

Why is that? In 1996 the Communicable Disease Center (CDC), our federal bulwark against harmful epidemics, was expressly instructed by Congress NOT to study anything related to guns, i.e. don’t give research grants, don’t establish data bases to track events, and don’t sic the EIS on the gun violence epidemic. In one of his rare Executive Orders President Obama instructed the CDC in 2012 to resume their gun violence research and asked Congress to allocate $10 million dollars for that purpose. Congress never did.

EIS stands for the Epidemic Intelligence Service, a division of the CDC. It has a stellar reputation for laser-focussed field analysis of incipient epidemics to guide early actions to contain them, to reduce any harm to people. Just last week the CDC launched an investigation into a cluster of 53 new HIV cases in Lowell, MA. (In 2007 Boston had a “cluster” of 92 gun-related homicides.) Ironically, the CDC remains hamstrung in any effort to collect and analyze data on the gun violence epidemic at a time when it is asking the general public to participate in identifying any other kind of potential epidemic via internet “crowd sourcing” .

The CDC does keep mortality statistics and issues an annual report of causes of death for each state. The difference of gun-related death rates  between states is huge, and  no one really knows why. Massachusetts had the lowest number of gun-related deaths in 2016: 3.4 deaths per 100,000 population, or 242 gun-related deaths in Massachusetts that year. Texas, Florida, and California had 3,353, 2,704, and 3,184 gun-related deaths respectively that same year. Those three states also had the most suicide deaths and the most accident-related deaths of all the states. That’s interesting, but those rates may not be related in any way to each other . Food for thought? Too bad the CDC can’t collect more data on gun deaths.

A gun is the harmful agent in this epidemic just as a virus is the harmful agent in the AIDS epidemic. True, human behavior is the cause for both of the epidemics spreading, but while we are developing a HIV vaccine we have implemented effective measures to contain the epidemic with “safe sex” campaigns, identification of risk factors, pre-natal treatment of HIV-positive pregnant women, early treatment of exposed newborns, and development of successful medical treatments. All of this was accomplished with the support of the CDC and NIH. Why not provide government support for similar interim steps to reduce the gun violence epidemic? Medical societies and many citizen groups have picked up the “safe gun” banner. Why hasn’t the federal government done so?

One answer is, of course, money. The NRA contributed money to 205 House members (189 Republicans and 16 Democrats) and 42 Senators (35 Republicans and 4 Democrats) in 2012. The Democratic Senator that got the most NRA money got less than the 41 Republicans above him or her on the list. 95 of the top 100 NRA money receivers in the House were Republicans. Most analysts actually consider this as “chump change” ($5,000-10,000 per Congressman) compared to the $18.6 million that the NRA spent on NRA-favorable candidates in the 2012 elections. Analysts speculate that the money buys “allegiance” rather than “influence” (whatever that means). We all know it buys lots of “thoughts and prayers.”

Another answer may be that there are more guns than people in the U.S. It is as if everyone had AIDS, or as if HIV- infected people considered it their constitutional right to do anything with it they wished to. We as a nation did a lot to reduce the harm of HIV without abolishing the HIV virus. Why can’t we take the same approach to gun violence? We could do quite a bit without abolishing guns if we could do research about how guns are spread, how they are used for harm (In fact, 50% of gun deaths are suicides), how we could reduce harmful use (electronic signatures, smart guns, trigger locks, no multiple cartridge magazine, etc.).

The significant reduction of auto accidents deaths was accomplished by multiple means (seat belts, car seat regulations, air bags, electronic sensors, changes in car manufacture, speed limit regulations, etc,) and not by abolishing cars or drivers’ licenses. With better data perhaps we could take effective action to reduce the gun death epidemic.

Claritin:gun cartoon


Vol. 190 April 1, 2018 Back To The Future

April 1, 2018

Hub thumbnail 2015On April 1st I have always published an April Fools Day blog; blogs that were clearly outrageous, but just believable enough to fool a few people. This year is different. The daily broadcasted “fake news”, and real news, is so outrageous and often almost believable that anything I could conjure up would pale by comparison. Besides, it would be very difficult for me to match the parody standards of Stephen Colbert, Samantha Bee, Trevor Noah, and SNL and their room full of writers. So today’s blog will present some fun facts from the past. They are true, and could, perhaps, give us a tiny bit of comfort in remembering past turmoil as ironic glimpses or even premonitions of the future that we now endure.

“What You Can Do About Today’s Hospital Costs”
             “Like everything else, the cost of being sick or hurt has gone up sharply. These skyrocketing medical costs have put millions of Americans in a dangerous spot, because their health insurance is no longer enough to pay the bills. So even though they have some protection, an illness or accident could cost them hundreds or thousands of dollars out of their own pockets. It could put them deep in debt for years to come. . . When you get sick or hurt, these plans pay you generous cash benefits that are tax free!”
– Look Magazine 7/29/1969, an ad from Bankers Insurance Co. for a Medicare gap policy when hospital stays were “$59-A-Day”. (see Hubslist March 2010)

Campaign Contributions to Members of Congress
               “The American Medical Political Action Committee (AMPAC), the political arm of the American Medical Association (AMA), contributed $2.4 million to candidates for Congress during the 1989-1990 campaign and $2.9million during the 1991-1992 campaign. . . . The AMPAC tended to support political conservatives, who tended to vote against the AMA positions on public health issues [like tobacco sale restrictions, handgun control, and repeal of the abortion “gag rule”] but who backed the AMA on political and economic issues.”
– January 6, 1994, New England Journal of Medicine Special Article, 330: 1, pg.32-37 (see Hubslist August 2009 )

A Short History of Medicine
“Doctor, I have an earache.”
2000 B.C. – “Here, eat this root.”
1000 B.C. – “That root is heathen, say this prayer.”
1850 A.D. – “That payer is superstition, drink this potion.”
1940 A.D. – ” That potion is snake oil, swallow this pill.”
1985 A.D. – “That pill is ineffective, take this antibiotic.”
2000 A.D. – ” That antibiotic is artificial. Here, eat this root.”
2020 A.D. – “That root is expensive. Here, put this warm oil in your ear.”
– February 7, 2000 from the internet, [We will read a lot more about placebo effect
in the next few years.] (see Hubslist2009)

My Palm Pilot
“I have discovered that my Palm Pilot was endowed by its creator with certain inalienable rights to do e-mail, check stocks, book travel arrangements, and browse the Web. But I have merely used it as a Rolodex and a date book. . . . I have had the creepy feeling that I’m not living up to the expectations of any kind of my new technology. . . . A recent Wall Street journal article warned us of the onslaught of more such gizmos. . . .I resist spending an enormous amount of time forming relationships with technology that I know from experience is likely to leave me. . . .In the same amount of time, Americans can either figure out their new software or their new tax package. . . .Every day we get more tools to do things that we don’t really want to do but feel dumb for not learning to do.”
– Ellen Goodman, April 1999, Boston Globe (see Hubslist December 2013        )

Before Emoticon Icons
:-)))   laughing out loud
:’-(   crying
:-II   angry
:-@   screaming
{ }   hug
:-*)   kiss
– 2001 from the internet.

Dilbert Explains Stock Investing
“First, employees provide valuable data.
A manager refines the data.
The CEO gives ‘visibility’ to analysis.
Accountants publish bad news in footnotes using a combination of nanotechnology and gibberish.
Discount brokerage firms tell you that you’re smart.
Investors present their own research on TV programs.”
Finally,

– Dilbert by Scott Adams, May 2, 2004

As an encore. . .  a “blast from the past” in biblical verse to once again remind us that “nothing changes while everything changes”.

Lamentations of the Father

“Hear me, O my children, for the bills they kill me. I pay and pay again, even to the twelfth time in a year, and yet again they mount higher than ever before. For our health, that we may be covered, I give six hundred and twenty talents twelve times in a year; but even this covers not the fifteen hundred deductible for each member of the family within a calendar year. And yet for ordinary visits we still are not covered, nor for many medicines, nor for the teeth within our mouths. . . .  And when the month of taxes comes, I will decry the wrong and unfairness of it, and mourn with wine and ashtrays, and rend my receipts. And you shall remember that I am that I am: before, after, and until you are twenty-one. Hear me then, and avoid me in my wrath, O children of me.”
– Ian Frazier 1999, “Household Principles”

Hubslist plugger cartoon 3:18                                                -1994

HAPPY EASTER

 


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