Vol.111 October 1, 2014 ; How Does Your Doctor Rate?

hubI think this is actually a trick question. I know very few people who have only one doctor. They have several, spanning different specialities.

 “Doctor Rating” sems to be  a thriving business. Consumer Reports Magazine (October 2014) lists six websites that present some sort of doctor ratings that go beyond the basic info provided by the AMA, Medicare, and state Boards of Registration in Medicine and state medical societies.

I examined these websites to see what I could learn how each one rated some primary care doctors that I know in my own vicinity. What I found was not particularly helpful nor illuminating for a variety of reasons.

The websites usually used two sets of criteria for ratings, one for the office (“ease of making appointment, friendly reception, etc.”) and one for the physician (“bedside manner, waiting time, clarity of discussion”,etc.”). Most used a rating of 1-5 stars, but one used “A-F”. Physician groups were rated, but to learn about individual doctors within the groups I had to scroll through individual patient text comments.  All of the websites had errors such as listing physicians who were dead, retired, back in India, or now in New Zealand.

I searched under “internists” and often also got dentists, obstetricians, cardiologists, oncologists, and even “lice doctors”. There seemed to be no rhyme nor reason to the sequence in which doctors were listed, except for the one website that highlighted the “Top 10” (apparently “patient satisfaction” was the sole criteria). Some websites forced me to scroll through all the names alphabetically to find the one name I was looking for. Some allowed me to search by individual name. Despite entering my zip code as a clue I got lists of doctors from many miles away. Some websites listed nurse-practitioners (NP) in the list which is not bad, might even be helpful, but it was not always clear with which physician(s) the NP was affiliated.

In the instances that I was able to find physicians about whom I had my own rating opinion, I did find that the website ratings generally matched my own bias. In the few instances that I could find the same physicians on different websites, the website ratings agreed.

Here are comments on my experience with specific websites:

Angieslist.com    “A to F”    Access to doctors’ rating for a year costs you $20.($16 if you use PayPal)
Gives number of reviews used to decide the rating (usually single digits); Have to click and scroll individual patient comments to identify individual physician rating in a group; three“A” reviews plus one “F” review created a “B” rating (4 reviews).

Healthgrades.com      1-5 Stars   Free Listed
177 internists near me, but listed only alphabetically; the first dozen or so listed would fit my “marginal” category; gives number of reviews used to decide the rating, but no patient comments/reviews presented; also included cardiologists and ophthalmologists.

Vitals.com    “Where doctors are examined.” 1-4 Stars   Free
136 internists near me, but the highest number of dead, moved, or wrong specialty doctors; had search “filters” to help me narrow my list, and the “patients’ choice” was the most helpful; you can choose a video that presents the ratings in a pleasing, non-revealing, fourth-grade-educational-level cartoon.

RateMDs.com     1-5 Stars     Free
Can search by name or “find a doctor by locale”; lists a “top 10” presumably based on patient satisfaction, but my doctor was NOT listed even though he is “the BEST doctor in the world” because no patients had submitted reviews.

Yelp.com   1-5 Stars   Free
The worst mix of wrong specialities and very few physicians listed; I suspect that doctors have to enter their own offices to this website or even pay for a listing, but I am not certain.

CastleConnolly.com   “Lists America’s Top Doctors”  An annual List and Book
Doctors are nominated, reviewed, and screened by a professional staff for this list founded by two men (neither one a physician) on the Board of Trustees of NYU Medical School; list is heavily weighted to academics in the NY metropolitan area.

Whosmydoctor.com    A work in progress; “not yet ready for prime time”
Leana Wen, MD, Rhodes Scholar, Director of patient-centered research at George Washington University, and a recent TEDMED presenter surveyed patients about what they wanted to know about their doctors. Almost everyone wanted to know that their doctors were competent, certified, and free to make evidenced-based medical decisions uninfluenced by whom they were paid. No surprise there. BUT, she also found that patients wanted to know something about the doctor’s values; what the doctors held dear to their heart!

“One after another, our respondents told us that the doctor-patient relationship is a very intimate one, that to show their doctors their bodies and share their deepest secrets, they want to first understand their doctor’s values.”

Dr. Wen set up a website “Who is My Doctor?” in which doctors could voluntarily state their feelings about reproductive medicine, alternative medicine, and end-of-life-decisions. This information, obviously beyond competency and source of compensation information, would be accessible to all patients and potential patients in an effort toward “total transparency”. The website and Dr. Wen apparently ran into a hailstorm of resistance from some physicians who did not believe that “total transparency” was a good thing. The website is currently just collecting signatures of those who support the concept, 387 to date.

Bottom line:
Doctor rating lists are not very helpful if you are blindly doctor-shopping in your area. If you do the usual thing and get some names of “good docs” from your friends and neighbors, then the rating websites could help you check out the opinions of other patients. None of these websites are as illuminating nor as complete as Trip Advisor…yet.

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One Response to Vol.111 October 1, 2014 ; How Does Your Doctor Rate?

  1. This is a really important topic — good work. People are having to change doctors a lot these days because of changing employer health plans, the need to move to a new location for a job, retirement (19% relocate to a new state and 30% relocate within same state), and going on Medicare (many primary care doctors dump patients over 65). And, many doctor’s practices are full (because they try to maximize the numbers of visits rather than try to keep patients from needing to have a visit). I recently had to find doctors for my parents — not at all easy. I used Healthgrades with some success but in the end found that I had to expand my search more miles away than was really convenient. I found practices with NPs or PAs seemed to have more openings. The larger practices seemed to be more accepting of Medicare. It’s hard to believe but the practice we eventually settled on required a “referral” from an existing patient — what a run around! Healthgrades did peg the internist we found as a very good one with several of positive comments. — she does seem very good in person. I managed to avoid several doctors with terrible comments and some disciplinary actions pending.

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